It’s been a good week. I had a great experience hanging out with some new friends that we had just met over a few bottles of wine. Sharing some vino with friends always reminds me why I love wine, and it also always puts me in the mood for…
The-good

They folks at the Wine Bloggers Conference didn’t give the guy the blogger of the year for nothing. This post from the 1 Wine Dude blog is worth 100 points itself. As a person who has fallen prey to “Blind Collection Mode” back in my baseball card days, I think Joe hits the nail right on the head. Really great post, plus anything that references the movie Joe vs. The Volcano is alright by me.

The-bad

So, as I was reading this post from my good friend Josh Wade, I was overcome by intense sadness that I will not be able to make the trip to Virginia for the Wine Bloggers Conference this year. Although I am really happy to be out here in Washington, the transition hasn’t really been a smooth one. Although I’m settled in with a good job now, the consistent income just came a few months too late to make a trip to Virginia realistic. Even sadder is that I am not alone in missing it, as I have seen a number of the other 2010 attendees are also not making it, including my buddies Steve Paulo and the Wine Biz Radio guys. I guess there is always 2011. Sigh.

The-ugly

I think that those of us who love wine (and really, what are you doing here if you don’t) will agree that “corked” wines, or those afflicted with trichloroanisole (TCA) are nothing if not ugly. Sean Sullivan has an interesting post on his Washington Wine Report blog that talks about his experiment in tracking corked wines throughout his tastings. The numbers have been right around 3% thus far, which is in line with what I have heard listed as an average rate for TCA in wines using natural cork closures. Sean asks what the acceptable rate is for TCA, and I’m pretty sure that all winemakers and consumers would agree that 0 would be a good number. Unfortunately, cork taint happens, so we have all just had to learn to live with it, or else switch over to all screwcap closures. Such is life.